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Sarahah Business model
Want to develop an app like Sarahah Business model and cost to develop an app like Sarahah. In case you’re beyond 18 years old and have as of late perused the “best downloads” chart on Apple’s App Store, you may end up pondering what the heck “Sarahah” is, and how it turned into the most famous application on the iPhone. The mysterious editorial application propelled in February; inexactly interpreted, its name signifies “genuineness” in Arabic. The application, hypothetically, does what it says on the tin: It enables clients to submit fair remarks, inquiries, and scrutinizes to their associates. How would you know they’re straightforward? Since the remarks are submitted secretly. You can think about where this is going.

Business model sarahah application

“People find their friends” profiles and leave remarks and inquiries either with their profile or namelessly.
Does anyone remember that awful website ask.fm from middle school, you know the one where you could anonymously message someone and be mean without consequences? Well, Sarahah is basically ask.fm’s younger sibling; the app, which roughly translates to “openness” and “candor” in Arabic, is an app and a website that allows users to anonymously message their friends and coworkers without fear of having their identity exposed.
According to their Website
, the intention of this platform is to “improve your friendship by discovering your strengths and areas for improvement” and “let your friends be honest with you.” You are not allowed to respond to any of the messages, and while there are different settings to help filter out the people whom has access to your inbox, you are ultimately given little control over who has permission to send you whatever they want. If that doesn’t sound like cyberbullying waiting to happen, then I don’t know what does.

Cost to develop an app like Sarahah Business model

Sarahah, however, wasn’t born to be just another teenager-infested hate app, it was actually created to give employees the opportunity to offer feedback to their bosses in a corporate setting to suggest areas for improvement without the fear of repercussions for their honesty. Zain al-Abidin Tawfiq, the developer from Saudi Arabia, noticed an issue in the workplace and wanted to create something to help people communicate frankly to their bosses. In this setting, Sarahah could prove to be very beneficial to many companies, especially in large corporate offices where the voices of those at the bottom of the totem pole may often be overlooked.
The website launched in fall 2016, and since then it has climbed its way up the charts to its current spot at number one in the App Store. It first began as a website exclusively in Saudi Arabia, then spread to other countries like Lebanon, Tunisia and Egypt, which is where it really began to take off.
Tawfiq decided that his idea had real potential to expand, so he decided to create an app version, and hired a company to help with the development. On June 13, 2017, Sarahah made its first appearance in the App Store, which was also the first time the app was translated into English, which allowed users from countries like Canada, America and Australia to take part in the action.
There are currently fifteen million users on Sarahah, which begs the question, what exactly is it about this app that makes it so popular? Well, people just really love anonymity, the idea that you can say whatever you want and not be held responsible. In “Fortune’s” recent Tech Talk debate, writer Jeff John Roberts says, “This just keeps coming back, this desire for anonymous communication, to go out there and hear things for real; I think it’s a desire for authenticity.”
Unfortunately, for its many users, there was a rumor going around that Sarahah would be releasing all of the users’ identities this August, which instilled some serious fear in many of those who had been using the app to send hate messages. However, luckily for all those trolls out there, the official Sarahah Twitter account tweeted, “The #Sarahah team would like to state that the rumor about ‘exposing identities on August 1st’ is false,” and thus put to rest the rumor that people might have to actually own up to the messages they’ve been sending.
The app has also recently added a new feature that allows you to connect your Sarahah account to your Snapchat, allowing other people to message you directly though Snapchat and receive the messages via Sarahah. Since other users do not have access to view the messages that someone else has received, teens have opted to screenshot their messages and post them on their Snap stories for their friends to see.
The screenshots that actually get posted to Snapchat are typically very positive messages, like “You’re so pretty, but I’m too scared to tell you in person” or “I always see you around campus and you’re so nice.” Don’t be fooled though, just because people aren’t posting them (because really, who would advertise their own hate mail to all their friends), doesn’t mean that there aren’t some pretty awful messages being sent.

The purpose of the app is apparently to help users at work discover their areas of strength and those in need of improvement. Outside of the workplace, it is intended to give companions a place to discuss sincerely with each other both their qualities and territories for development.
Dissimilar to customary informal communities, clients can’t collaborate with each other straightforwardly. There is no answer component, or sign of who a message is from.
Since its launch two months ago it has reached number one in Apple’s App Store in 30 countries, including the UK.

How does work sarahah application ?

Once downloaded, users need to set up an account on the Sarahah app to start receiving messages. They can impart their profile to companions or on their other web-based social networking accounts so individuals can send them mysterious messages. Clients can likewise look into individuals they know whether they have the username in an inquiry area of the application.

New messages show up in a feast upon the application, which can be favourited, sent or erased. The sender isn’t alarmed about any of these activities. Clients can likewise piece senders in the event that they get a message that is hostile or makes them awkward.

Sarahah doesn’t let users reply to messages or find out who sent them.

Will it lead to online bullying?/h4>
Not everyone agrees with the mission of the app, and some users say it will facilitate and encouraging bullying online. Critics on social media have said the anonymity granted by Sarahah gives users “an excuse to bully people” and that it will lead to abuse.

Tawfiq has denied claims Sarahah is a tool for abuse, saying it is designed for “constructive feedback”. But the company recently added a tool that lets users block messages from senders who may have sent offensive messages. When blocking a contact, Sarahah won’t reveal who sent the message but will make sure they are not able to send any more.

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If your motive is to start-up and build the next chartbuster on-demand mobile app like Sarahah, then contact us  today. Our expert team will listen you, experience and consultative approach towards the business and will discuss cost of the app like Sarahah Business model, in the field of on demand apps, can help you shape an outstanding and scalable on demand mobile app. Hire us for your dream on-demand mobile app development  now, by choosing us as your technology partner.

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